SEOdamian's Blog

Helping others understand & share about technology, search

Branding and Collaboration

The blog ChurchMarketingSucks had a recent post on creating your congregation’s brand. Here is my response to their key questions of:

Should you find your church in need of an effective brand management strategy, here are three questions that I submit as points to start the dialogue:

    1. What is your church’s brand?
    2. Who is specifically responsible for managing your church’s brand?
    3. How do you effectively communicate your church’s brand internally and externally?

Another way to put the concept is, how can you meet the needs of your audience. For example, if visiting seekers are looking for your services, what can you do to help them understand what you have is what they are looking for?

The post’s questions are a great start. Let me just highlight that branding is not a one step effort but an ongoing process. You don’t just put up a sign with a simple logo and call it done. You don’t just put a logo on the bulletin and call it done. You need to do more then add a color to the name tags to be finished. Branding is a process of communicating what the values, ideal and aspirations of an organization through symbols as well as words. Do you know any other process that has been ongoing for say about 2000 years?

Communicating the truth of your services will take time and effort. You need to put it in the language of your seekers, not the internal shorthand of those inside. You need to share the joy and fun of joining. But then some causes are worth a little effort aren’t they?

photograph of a billboard showing $1 drinks at McDonalds featuring coca cola

Both Coca Cola and McDonald’s worked co-operatively for common goals – get more followers.

The idea of working in collaboration has been around for a while, and CharlotteOne has a great idea. Notice how well McDonalds and CocaCola have been working together for a few years. Both win by meeting the needs of their customers.

I also remind others that defining your brand can be a significant effort. Especially for those not practiced in brand development work. But the beginning approach is to look at what the value is to a new guest to your house. Consider how their needs can be met better, or more uniquely then the other choices a visitor has. Every town has a variety of churches sharing the word of Christ. Again the key is to look at it through the visitors perspectives. Your perspective can provide hints. But more importantly look at what you valued when you 1st entered your congregation and what your needs were then. Consider what you were looking for, and how you choose to attend.

Branding can be  a great way to define what your value can be to a new seeker. This effort can be lead by others or used as a team development project that can truly inspire all to greater sense of clarity to what the value is to the seeker.

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June 22, 2012 Posted by | copywriting | , , , | Leave a comment

IRCE 2012 – Internet Retailer Conference and Exhibition tradeshow at Chicago’s McCormick Place

IRCE (Internet Retailer Conference and Exhibition) is over for 2012.

http://irce.internetretailer.com/2012/exhibits/

Learning more in person then online

To all who came to IRCE2012, THANKS for visiting Chicago, the local economy appreciated your visit. I appreciated your ideas and the opportunity for networking in my backyard.

Even after all these years in technology, it still amazes me to see how technology continues to move quickly in a few different directions. So while I will be highlighting some different companies I met or got reaquanted with in the near future here at SEODamian in future posts,  let me share what I see were some major trends here from the show.

One of the big values I find in going to trade shows is the ability to compare and contrast different vendors in the same hour. The challenge with other solutions for comparing (trade journals, industry reviews, analyst reports) is that they often span data that makes comparisons irrelevant. They are X’s last quarter’s version compared to Y’s next quarter’s beta version. You still get the same issue at a tradeshow, but you can typically sniff out the game and get the real scoop on what the 2 companies are at today, and compare to 3 other similar solutions.  Some of the key trends I saw in Internet retailing are:

  • Prices are dropping. No big change there, except the rate they continue to drop. Typically not the same product at the same company, but by a new competitor creating most of the functionality of an existing solution and more for a lower price. Be it Chat and chat management (LivePerson look out, LogMeIn and others are looking to eat your lunch), survey tools, Addon’s to Magento (shopping cart platform), shipping auditing (no minimums needed here), affiiliate management, flash sales tools (keep it all in house or partner) and more.
  • SaaS is the trend. The cost to distribute code to customers, and deal with your internal data center/stack complexities is too expensive for most tool creators. It is far easier for them to increase staff to keep 1 (or 2) data center up and going, then trying to guess how you (the customer) tried to make your data center secure and how you dealt with your specific legacy issues.  The test bed is far easier to set up (if they are using AWS-Amazon Web Services, it is about 3 command lines to generate ‘another’ test bed). If you as a retailer can’t deal with SaaS or it’s API, look for adding at least one 0 (zero) to your cost in purchase price, and far more in TCO.
  • Big data is here. Small startups need a credit card with a few dollars open on it to get a billion dollar data center (Amazon Web Services) to build ‘rock hard’ services. The cost of AWS is low enough that the ability to deal with incredible amounts of data in real-time changes what is being deployed as solutions. This shows up at the consumer level as presorted and pretargeted for their needs, not brood strokes. No longer is confirmation that a card number may be valid a real number good enough. It has to be validated that it belongs as a charge, not reported stolen and has the proper credit limit. 
  •  The is no one stop shopping. The amount of tools to run a successful ecommerce site continues to grow. From the need to change pricing rapidly on one or all your SKU’s, to deploying across multiple channels (store, Amazon, eBay, Affiliate, traditional site, Facebook, ShopEngines) you need a collection of tools that is reminiscent of the stacks of apps in the 70’s and 80’s. The big difference, they are best not home developed, and often hosted in and out of house.
  • Change is now often measured in weeks and months rather then years for software deployment. If you don’t like what you see today, what a quarter and redo your RFP (Request for Proposal). But monitor the products and community reaction in the meantime.

There was a lot more I saw, but 500 booths is hard to summarize in a few lines, so more to follow in the next posts.

June 8, 2012 Posted by | Chicago, hosting, Large SKU site, resources, SEM Industry, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Do You Think Auto-Responders Suck?

While reading a discussion on using auto-responders for visitors to church congregation websites, I felt compelled to share my thoughts.

The ideas apply not only in email relationship building, but also in all online relationship building. The core is building trust.

As was stated, the concept of auto-responder email is good. It has been proven effective repeatedly in the for-profit world, because it can build trust. However, most implementation in secular and non-secular of auto-responders is terrible.  Just as a greeter at a store can totally change the experience for the better or sink the relationship with the whole chain, so can poorly written email generic auto-responders. A poorly written email auto-responder can seem like a chain letter or worse.

There is a reason why communications professionals will write 50 drafts. They are working  to get the best chance to communicate the intended tone and message to their audience. Just like a minister will often spend all day or all week writing a sermon to get it ‘correct’, and it still evolves through multiple services on a Sunday (or Friday or Saturday).   Even the Bible has gone through a few revisions of the centuries to make sure its message and tone is unmistakable (perhaps it may not be done being revised to tell its story based on the number of interpretations of its messages in different denominations across the country and world).

More Recent Data – Direct Marketing

I would recommend that we look at what has a longer history then email auto-responders for how to most effectively communicate with new relationships. While still much newer then the Bible, direct marketing or direct mail has a much longer history then email. Direct marketing studies performed decades ago realized that it took seven (from letters, TV spots, Radio or in-store visits) ‘touches’ to get the optimum amount of interaction with a perspective person to solidify the relationship (relative to invested cost of each piece). New studies increase that to 9 or 11 touches with the increased onslaught of communications and greater sensitivity to building trust.

That is much of what is at issue here – trust. Does the new guest trust that you understand them? And do they trust they understand the ‘real’ congregation you represent? It becomes hard to trust that you understand someone who may not understand themselves (as may often be the case of shoppers/searchers). It becomes hard to trust, if they only meet a few people in a congregation. It becomes hard to trust if they don’t have a solid referral from someone they trust (especially if they are coming from a place that did have solid referrals and it did not work out). A congregation is where many people put more trust then most any other relationship they have (including family or spouses). Visitors may not know they are looking for a place to put that much trust, but often they are.

Trust must often be earned, over multiple interactions

Have you earned that trust?

Look at how would you build trust with a new relationship in an off-line manner and consider how to translate it to written form. That may include some disclosure yourself and the congregation (when the annual meeting is, how the board is elected), but often not on the 1st touch. It may include offers to be inclusive, but just as you would not propose on the 1st date, you may not invite someone to lead a group in the 2nd email. The building of trust is based on a mutual exchange of signals that show commitment on both sides. If you don’t properly respond to a visitors signals you are being as rude as kissing someone who shows no interest in a physical relationship.

Of course in the age of digital tools like Constant Contact, iContact, HubSpot, InfusionSoft and many others, the best practice is to consider not creating a single one size fits all approach. Again the lessons and proof go back to the early days of direct marketing and have shown a segmented approach is best.  Send a different series of letters to parents then young adults (possibly both if they are indeed young adult parents). The relationship of an empty nester will be different then many 30 year old divorcee’s.

Consider an Email Service Provider for your auto responder needs

If they overlap, consider staggering your send times. Don’t send them all on Mondays, send the parent letters/auto-responders on Wednesday, Young adults on Friday, etc.

Look at the rules of etiquette in similar online venues (online dating is probably the most clearly documented) and use them to create an appropriate method to build trust with new visitors and you will create many new relationships.

Auto-responders (multiple with proper spacing) can be a great tool in developing mutual trust in a new congregant, especially if it is integrated with personal touches along the way. Especially if it is show ing of the care you would take for a new parishioner. This is your chance to show you care. Does that not deserve a little more effort then 10 minutes for a one size fits all generic letter.

How much time and effort do you typically spend on your auto responder emails? How many do you use? Join the conversation below and share your wisdom.

May 1, 2012 Posted by | copywriting, local marketing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How will you choose a startup for providing you services when there are many already doing the same kind of job work?

A post in LinkedIn (a tool you should be using for learning, sharing and reputation building) asked the above question. The answer is core to most businesses. But it is also what needs to be shared in short order on your website. Assuming your website is trying to communicate why someone should work with you. If you have other primary objectives (and you need to be clear on your site’s objectives), then this still needs to be a part of your site somewhere.

Comfort of the Relationship:
I will choose a vendor based on the comfort of the relationship we can build. That comfort is in communicating that a vendor:

  • Understands my needs, That may be by being local, in my niche, knowing me personally, sharing your expertise.
  • Understands the industry today, Most industries are rapidly changing. Do you understand the journey my business is on and the challenges my competitors and myself are and will be facing?
  • Understands Where the industry is going. Help me understand the opportunities, and to help me avoid the traps, What are the new regulations, what are the new 600 lb gorilla’s, what new technology will be crushing my advantage, what new profit model will change my world?
  • Communicates What are the liabilities to avoid with other’s solutions. Your competitors have disadvantages – don’t bad mouth the competition, but inform me of what to pay attention to, let me understand how to evaluate your services independently so I know what is real (steak) and what is sizzle.
  • Communicates that you are trustworthy even if you don’t promise the most. Let me see you participating in my community, returning my calls when promised, sending me information relevant to my needs (the more specific the better), recommendations from others-the more closely related to me the better.

Another way to say ‘by differentiation’. You may provide the exact same service, but I know you are providing the right service for me because you understand my needs, and are looking out for my best interests not others (including your own) in our transaction and relationship.

When you understand that your relationship with a potential client may start with your website, you can see how important the look and feel of the site is.

By the way, in order to effectively address most of these issues, you will create pages that is SEO friendly if not well designed.

Talking about your industry will let Google know where to ‘slot’ your services. Referencing the past industry issues will show your expertise. Of course linking to experts makes it even easier. Sharing your knowledge about the future again lets people know that you understand and care, but also lets Google know that your solutions are broader in scope.

So after you try to show how much you care about your clients, ask your clients for feedback to see if you are successful. If you are not, be patient – you probably did not give your elevator speech perfect the 1st time you attempted it. Part of building relationship and trust is having dialog, and being open to feedback and continuing to improve your site, skills, and presentation.

What are your thoughts on differentiating yourself from your competition?

PS. A new blog I am working with Andy Kurz on is Healthcare Insurance Reform Analysis and Trends

November 12, 2010 Posted by | Community, copywriting, How To, LinkedIn | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

When is the best time to call a lead?

Bill asked the question in his blog http://blog.marketo.com/blog/2010/07/perfect-timing-%E2%80%93-when-to-call-a-prospect.html/comment-page-1#comment-5180

Here is my response to his discussion:

To me the answer was ASK. Before I scrolled down to your recommendations, that what was screaming in my mind. More and more the trying to parse someones specific needs based on all sorts of psycographic indicators is like trying to fish without radar. It may work in the aggregate, but if you are concerned about the individual day’s catch, it is a poor strategy. An individual purchaser’s will be different at different times. I was thinking how I purchase, and more and more, when I find a potential solution resource is varied from where I am in the sales cycle. I may find a new solution as I am checking the references of a final candidate, and having legal reviewing the contract, or I may find a resource as I am considering the category.

Besides, if you ask, it builds relationship and shows that you are more concerned about the clients needs rather then your own. And that will certainly help improve the sales cycle.

What are your thoughts?

July 10, 2010 Posted by | Community, local marketing | , , , , | Leave a comment